ArtPrize 2013 Artists

[toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Adam Mulder” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Adam Mulder” text_show=”Adam Mulder” text_hide=”Adam Mulder” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
In Melancholy, Adam Mulder uses the seed form as the physical incarnation of his own struggle with depression. Seeds form and transform through external and internal stimuli, much the way human personality traits and emotional identity form through our daily encounters with hardship and blessing. The hypnotic blue lights and the shining outer surfaces of the main body of the seed entice the viewer, which Mulder links to his experience with depression as a strangely appealing monster that can be difficult to escape.

 

Bio:
Adam Mulder is a recent graduate of the MFA program in Sculpture at Southern Illinois University, where his work explored the idea of seed forms as a metaphor for human experience. He recently accepted a position as Visiting Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Oklahoma State University, where he teaches beginning to advanced sculpture courses as well as 3D foundations. Mulder travels frequently between Oklahoma and his home in Illinois to see his wife and two-year-old daughter.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Alex MacLean” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Alex MacLean” text_show=”Alex MacLean” text_hide=”Alex MacLean” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The expansion of habitation into the desert reveals how cultural and economic forces are slow to adapt to, and even ignore, the realities of nature. These pictures show land surveyed and divided for ownership and laid-out to be accessed by motorized vehicles, a built landscape that is neither sustainable nor self-sufficient. The settlement pattern defies nature in the face of climate change as other habitats are simultaneously upended along low-lying coastal areas and in forested fire zones. The images question our values and collective reality beyond the settlements seen on these arid lands. MacLean’s powerful and descriptive images provide clues to understanding the relationship between the natural and constructed environments.

 

Bio:
Pilot and photographer Alex MacLean has flown his plane over much of the United States documenting the landscape. Trained as an architect, he has portrayed the history and evolution of the land from vast agricultural patterns to city grids, recording changes brought about by human intervention and natural processes. MacLean’s photographs have been exhibited widely in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia and are found in private, public and university collections.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Alexis Rockman” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Alexis Rockman” text_show=”Alexis Rockman” text_hide=”Alexis Rockman” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
This image explores the trend already underway of tropical saltwater fish and invertebrates migrating into the Hudson River. This wildlife is taking over indigenous species, and all are finding new homes in the decommissioned subway cars intentionally sunk into the river. Fantastic opportunities will arise from this new eco-scape created by human civilization – a radically different space from the one to which we have grown accustomed.
Species list: Fish: blue parrotfish, blue angelfish, foureye butterflyfish, green moray eel, grey snapper, porcupinefish, queen triggerfish, silver lamprey.
Invertebrates: blue crabs, Boring Sponge, Chinese Mitten Crab, Ghost Anemone, lionsmane jellyfish, purple sea urchin.

 

Bio:
For almost three decades, Rockman has depicted a darkly surreal vision of the collision between civilization and nature. The artist’s epic paintings of apocalyptic scenarios demonstrate his signature subject matter as well as his meticulous technique depicting scientific detail, skillful use of intense color, and monumental scale.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Ana Michaelis” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Ana Michaelis” text_show=”Ana Michaelis” text_hide=”Ana Michaelis” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Ana Michaelis constructs imaginary landscapes, uninhabited and misty. In ILLUSION, the natural scene is veiled behind layers of white paint, maintaining the mystery of the landscape. She is interested in evoking memories, those that we bring with us and those that our eyes show us. In ILLUSION, the viewer is surrounded by a large imaginary landscape that seems to disappear, bridging the gap between memories and imagination. It suggests a sense of elongated time and the quiet side of nature, inviting reflection and meditation on our perception of reality.

 

Bio:
Ana Michaelis was born in Rio de Janeiro, but currently lives and works in São Paulo, Brazil. Since graduating from the School of Fine Arts in São Paulo, she has participated in group and solo exhibitions around the world including in Dubai, Madrid, Monaco, and Lisbon.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Brandy Van Zalen” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Brandy Van Zalen” text_show=”Brandy Van Zalen” text_hide=”Brandy Van Zalen” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Pollen of the Great Lakes is a series of four canvases illustrating the biodiversity and intricate beauty of tree pollen found in the Great Lakes region. Each grain of pollen was hard carved and printed with ink, then heat embossed with various powders and glitters. Van Zalen is especially interested in the intricate detail and three-dimensional aspects of the pollen grains. Though invisible to the naked eye, these microscopic pollen grains surround us.

 

Bio:
Brandy Van Zalen is a West Michigan native and is a graduate of Rogers High School, Grand Rapids Community College where she studied zoology, and Grand Valley State University. She works as an independent artist illustrating children’s books including the butterfly series authored by Dr. Matthew Douglas of GRCC, which connect meaningful family values through the use of scientifically accurate animal life. Her goal in all of her work is to accurately represent the junction between the visual arts and the natural sciences and to bridge the gap that currently exists between the two.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Cody Erickson” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Cody Erickson” text_show=”Cody Erickson” text_hide=”Cody Erickson” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
In Consolation, the landscape serves as a stage for leisure. Erickson explores the question of how leisure activities define us, both as a culture and as in how we find meaning in the natural world around us.

 

Bio:
Cody Erickson was born in the Midwest and has spent recent years in Michigan. He earned an MFA from Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Currently, he is a part-time professor of figure drawing at College of Creative Studies in Detroit, where he also studied for his BFA.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Danielle Rante” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Danielle Rante” text_show=”Danielle Rante” text_hide=”Danielle Rante” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The slow retreat of Iceland’s largest glacier, Vatnajökull, is something Danielle Rante has been exploring in the past year. This particular glacier has been retreating since 1920, with clear visual evidence from the base of the glacier to across the glacial lagoon to the ocean. The lagoon is constantly shifting, with icebergs flipping to balance themselves and pieces breaking from other pieces. When the iceberg calves, there is a brilliant teal blue that marks the fresh break before which then turns white again. The beauty of this phenomenon has a cost, and there is an extreme sadness to what we are witnessing. Chasing Ice is based on this Icelandic lagoon and its ever-changing state.

 

Bio:
Danielle Rante’s current work explores relationships of patterned consciousness with the patterns of natural phenomenon and landscape. She has exhibited work nationally and internationally, and has attended residencies at The Headlands Center for the Arts, Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Nes in Iceland. Danielle Rante lives and works Columbus, OH where she is an Assistant Professor of Printmaking and Drawing at Wright State University.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Deanna Morse” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Deanna Morse” text_show=”Deanna Morse” text_hide=”Deanna Morse” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Whispers of the Prairie is an animated video that celebrates the medley of native flowers that thrive in our forests, parks, and lawns. Informed by history, the piece celebrates the native and prairie plants that dominated the landscape of the Midwest prior to settlement. Re-introducing native plants in our landscape today will help insure their survival, and the health of the many birds and butterflies that depend on them. By celebrating and maintaining this diversity in our own backyards, we ensure the preservation of rich natural resources for future generations.

 

Bio:
Deanna Morse is an independent film/video animation artist whose work has been featured on Sesame Street. She has had exhibitions around the world, is in international museum collections including Metropolitan Museum of Art, and was recently an Artist in Residence at the Everglades National Park, Florida. Morse is a Professor of Film and Video Production in the School of Communications at Grand Valley State University. She is currently on the board of ASIFA, the largest and oldest international animation organization.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Erin Anderson” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Erin Anderson” text_show=”Erin Anderson” text_hide=”Erin Anderson” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The energy that makes up nature, weather, and the elements are all inextricably linked together in a complex cycle. Anderson envisions the energy of people as behaving in a similar fashion. Emanation No. 2 is an exploration of portraiture as both a physical and energetic representation. The figure’s energy is represented by copper, a natural metal known for its conductive properties. Its reflective qualities also reference religious paintings of the old masters in which metal leaf was used to signify holiness. Anderson’s painting is a visual exploration of modern spiritual belief, inspired by findings in science and nature.

 

Bio:
Erin Anderson originally hails from Waterville, Ohio. She graduated from Miami University with a bachelor’s degree in Social Psychology and a minor in Entrepreneurship. After college, she enrolled in the fine art school The Waichulis Studio (now The Ani Academy Waichulis). The focus of her work is centered upon portraiture and depicting the human figure. She currently works and resides in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Geo Space” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Geo Space” text_show=”Geo Space” text_hide=”Geo Space” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
FireFly by GeoSpace Studio is an all weather, self-illuminated, human-powered vehicle. The work is an idea for the future, as our current energy-intensive mode of living will soon have to be replaced with more efficient solutions. Taking on the challenge to find a solution that addresses our range of human needs but that is also inspirational enough to be adapted for use, Geo Space attempts to address the physical needs of year-round cycling while also presenting an object that is practical and beautiful. The FireFly shell connects to the front boom of a recumbent trike to create a cycling experience that provides a high level of visibility and protection for any kind of weather, especially dark, cold, or wet environments. Inspired by the exoskeleton of the insect for which it is named, FireFly draws inspiration from nature in order to consider the human experience in a new way.

 

Bio:
Geo Space is an artist and designer interested in the future of low energy vehicles and dwellings. He has many years of experience in designing and building furniture, sculptures, and other functional art objects.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”James Peterson” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”James Peterson” text_show=”James Peterson” text_hide=”James Peterson” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
James Peterson’s dynamic sculpture hypothesizes what happens as synthetic lifeforms take the place of the organic. It also explores the balance between pollution and sustainability. The piece was inspired by barnacle formations and tessellates over the wall to create luminous patterns. The piece is partially interactive, allowing viewers to transform the color and the experience.

 

Bio:
James Peterson is a Michigan native and a graduate from Kendall College of Art and Design, who has always been curious about the relation between organic and man-made materials. His education has led him to the realm of computer-aided fabrication, allowing him to combine his interest in materials and processes with a new way of artistic expression. Peterson’s works and installations have been featured in several California exhibitions, including the City of West Hollywood’s “Go To The Park” exhibit, The Los Angeles Art Show and The Burning Man Project. He is currently based in Los Angeles and works at Southern California Institute of Architecture.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Jason Gamrath” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Jason Gamrath” text_show=”Jason Gamrath” text_hide=”Jason Gamrath” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Botanical Exotica: A Monumental Collection of the Rare Beautiful is a colossal garden of glass and steel orchids. The rigors of day-to-day life in an urban setting inspired Gamrath to focus on the natural beauty of plants. Plants are made of a great number of small parts, and the purpose of creating this series on a macro scale is to bring to light the beauty that exists within the micro scale of nature and to inspire curiosity and appreciation of the natural world.

 

Bio:
Based in Seattle, artist Jason Gamrath is passionate about glass. He has been working in glass for ten years and trained at Pratt Fine Arts Center and the world-renowned Pilchuck Glass School.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Kathleen Studebaker” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Kathleen Studebaker” text_show=”Kathleen Studebaker” text_hide=”Kathleen Studebaker” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The Waste Land is an installation of otherworldly machines, each of which are incomplete, cracked, broken, and clearly obsolete. They are being overgrown and pulled apart by strange and alien plant-forms. Above them, lights imitate the effect of sunlight steaming through a broken wall. The scene is one of post-apocalyptic mystery, as if it is the undisturbed leavings of a lost civilization. This work is about the passage of time, and the overwhelming wonder of our inability to stand against it.

 

Bio:
Kathleen Studebaker is a recent MFA graduate from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, IL. She focuses primarily on wood and metal in her work, but she also has a great love of drawing and painting as well. Her goal as an artist is to create work that transports her audience, showing them an alternative version of reality, and giving them an experience of exploration, discovery and wonder.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Kim Cridler” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Kim Cridler” text_show=”Kim Cridler” text_hide=”Kim Cridler” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Field Study 20: Thicket is a freestanding sculpture fabricated from steel with silver blossoms. Concealed within the thicket-like growth is a gray catbird also made from steel wire. The bird appears to be tethered within the thicket by a golden string, though it is unclear if it is being protected or restrained. In this work, Kim Cridler has moved from a balanced order of pattern to show the beginnings of disorder which is a reminder that no matter how carefully we construct and manage our daily experiences, life will not leave us alone or untouched.

 

Bio:
Trained as a metalsmith, Kim Cridler creates works that utilize the history, making, and meaning of craft and ornamentation. Kim was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, earned an MFA in Metals from the State University of New York at New Paltz, and studied at Skowhegan School of Sculpture and Painting. Kim has taught in art programs across the country including the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Michigan, San Diego State University, Arizona State University, and the Penland School of Crafts.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Llisa Demetrios” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Llisa Demetrios” text_show=”Llisa Demetrios” text_hide=”Llisa Demetrios” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Fragments of Time are bronze shards from Llisa Demetrios’s Inner Core Samples series. With her ongoing interest in capturing time in sculpture, the bronze pillars show the layers of the earth with varied textures, like a core sample drilled and brought up to the surface. Through this compressed version of time, the current landscape is connected to the vast history of earth below the surface, showing how this is one moment amidst the eons of history. By reflecting the past, we are prompted to think about the choices we make and how we will impact the future.

 

Bio:
Llisa Demetrios has been a bronze sculptor for over twenty years. She often begins a series by making small wood maquettes and then fabricating in bronze in her studio. She has an ongoing interest in portraying time in sculpture, as in the textured layers of the earth in the Inner Core Sample series. Granddaughter of designers Charles and Ray Eames, Demetrios shares a studio space with her mother, sculptor Lucia Eames, in California.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Mark Rumsey” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Mark Rumsey” text_show=”Mark Rumsey” text_hide=”Mark Rumsey” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
These prints are a response to the building in which Rumsey spent an Artist’s Residency, the Swatch Art Peace Hotel in Shanghai. Scars and patches on the 100+-year-old walls create a newly-imagined geography of time, place, and space. These images incorporate both historical and current elements of cartography. The “Map Pin” icon, familiar from the interface we use to access information digitally, merges with the “Eye of God,” suggesting the omnipresent nature of contemporary communication. The overall shapes are drawn from World Map projections, distorted in order to allow a flat map to represent Earth’s sphere. Rumsey also pays with the printmaking tradition of signature chops, which originated in China to indicate who made the object and where it was made. Here Rumsey updates the tradition, using QR codes and historic symbols.

 

Bio:
Mark Rumsey is an artist working in the realms of social interactions and spacial manipulations. Rumsey has recently returned from Shanghai, China where he was in residence as a Guest Artist at the Swatch Art Peace Hotel. Previous artist residencies have included Rondo Atelier in Austria, The Studios of Key West, Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium, Caravansarai in Turkey, and Global Arts Village in India. Rumsey is based in Grand Rapids, and his work has been exhibited nationally and internationally.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Osamu James Nakagawa” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Osamu James Nakagawa” text_show=”Osamu James Nakagawa” text_hide=”Osamu James Nakagawa” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The hyperreality of James Nakagawa’s photographs of the towering Banta cliffs stems from the artist’s use of digital technology. He stitches together multiple exposures to create images in which every plane is in razor-sharp focus and seen from a dizzying perspective. For the Gama caves, Nakagawa illuminated the dark and airless caves with his flashlight, splashing the wall during long exposures. The artist was drawn to the cliffs and caves (known as banta and gama in Okinawan) because of their severe beauty and their emotionally complex history. When American forces invaded Okinawa in the spring of 1945, thousands of Okinawans threw themselves off the cliffs and took their lives in the caves. The circumstances surrounding the mass suicides remain controversial; according to survivors’ accounts, Japanese military officers ordered civilians to commit suicide to avoid the shame of capture and to save dwindling food supplies for the troops.

 

Bio:
Osamu James Nakagawa was born in New York City; raised in Tokyo, Japan and returned to Houston, Texas at the age of 15. He received his MFA from the University of Houston in 1993. Currently, Nakagawa is Associate Professor of Photography at Indiana University. Nakagawa is the recipient of 2009 Guggenheim Fellowship and 2010 Higashikawa Photo Festival New Photographer of the Year in Japan, and his work is shown internationally.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Samuel Gomez” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Samuel Gomez” text_show=”Samuel Gomez” text_hide=”Samuel Gomez” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
This triptych drawing is a surreal graphic satire in which, instead of depicting the ‘ideally wished’ landscape of the future of nature, Samuel Gomez showcases the very things that are preventing us from moving forward and coexisting with nature in a responsible manner. The first and third panels depict corporations and a capitalist system, the interests that he believes are stopping us from a sustainable future. The center panel is the harvest, an allegorical place where we all come to harvest our dreams, wishes, desires, and goals. It features a clockwork casino with a dandelion flower made of bubbles as the source. People gather here to work, whistling away their dreams. Some dreams grow and some dreams burst, but all of the dreams together make up the intricate landscape of human emotions.

 

Bio:
Samuel Gomez is an artist living and working in New York City. His artwork contains allegories to scientific, socioeconomic, automation and sustainability issues, often with an up-front humor and a hybrid surreal-steampunk style. Born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Gomez graduated from the Altos de Chavon/The School of Design (affiliated with the Parsons School of Design) in 1999. After receiving a scholarship from Parsons in New York, he graduated with a BFA in Communication Design.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Shahzia Sikander” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Shahzia Sikander” text_show=”Shahzia Sikander” text_hide=”Shahzia Sikander” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The Last Post is inspired by Shahzia Sikander’s on-going interest in the colonial history of the sub-continent. In the film, Sikander uses subtle references to the Company School, a style of painting that developed in eighteenth-century India as Europeans sought documentation of the country’s exotic plants, architecture and nature. The protagonist is an East India Company man who appears in various guises throughout the work.

 

Bio:
Internationally recognized Pakistani-American artist Shahzia Sikander is best known for her experimentation with the formal constructs of Indo-Persian miniature painting in a variety of formats and mediums. She received her BFA in 1992 from the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan, and her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1995. She has pioneered an interpretive and critically-charged approach to miniatures while examining and intervening in cultural and political boundaries. Her work helped launch a major resurgence in the Miniature Painting department in the 1990s at the National College of Arts in Lahore, inspiring many others to examine this tradition.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Sophia Collier” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Sophia Collier” text_show=”Sophia Collier” text_hide=”Sophia Collier” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
GRAND is a 22-foot sculptural portrait of the Grand River after midnight. The work is comprised of three acrylic blocks carved into a realistic cross-section of the Grand River. To create the surface, Collier has developed a software model of wind and current in the Grand Rapids area and incorporated patterns of sound waves from the region, allowing her to make a solid object from the intangible sound and water waves. The work itself, while using sound in its design, is silent, reflecting the stillness of deep night. To create GRAND, Collier incorporated sounds from various sources, including her own on-site recordings, oral histories, music, and sounds provided by the public.

 

Bio:
Sophia Collier carves water surfaces from acrylic block using a process combining imagination, software and machine tools to capture wind and light on water. Her interest in doing this began one day when she was walking across a bridge and wanted to reach down into the water and pick up a piece of the shining surface to keep forever. She traveled to Detroit and found expert machinists to teach her precision milling. She learned animation and 3D modeling, and experimented with materials to develop a color palette in acrylic block. Rather than hire fabricators, she developed methods and equipment to make every piece herself in her studio in Sausalito, California.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Stephen Hannock” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Stephen Hannock” text_show=”Stephen Hannock” text_hide=”Stephen Hannock” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Stephen Hannock’s vista with text and collage is a celebration of what the artist believes to be the two most dynamic works of industrial art currently in North America: Xu Bing’s “Phoenix”, on view for the next year at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in North Adams, and Niagara Falls. The Falls at Niagara can be considered “industrial art” as they have been repeatedly manipulated and partially diverted due to its use by hydro-electric facilities. Other stories woven throughout the painting involve artists Maya Lin, Mark Bradford and Chuck Close.

 

Bio:
Stephen Hannock is an American luminist painter known for his atmospheric landscapes and incendiary nocturnes. His experiments with machine-polishing the surfaces of his paintings give a trademark luminous quality to his work. The larger vistas also incorporate diaristic text that weaves throughout the composition. His design of visual effects for the 1998 film What Dreams May Come won an Academy Award. His works are in collections worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Tama Baldwin” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Tama Baldwin” text_show=”Tama Baldwin” text_hide=”Tama Baldwin” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Tama Baldwin’s photographic series is titled after the Anthropocene, the unofficial new name for our geological era popularized by climate scientist Paul Crutzen. Crutzen believes the impact our species has had upon the planet since the industrial revolution is so consequential it is time to rename the era accordingly. True North is a series of digital photographs of the arctic tundra that deliberately reference historical landscape painting. Baldwin shares the Romantic landscape painters’ passion for horizon and sky and their interest in the drama of climate and geology, but what was metaphor for the 19th century artists is now literal in her images: the glow on the horizon of her night images is not cosmological; the clouds roiling over tundra contain more than seasonal rain–they are direct evidence of rapid climate change.

 

Bio:
Tama Baldwin is a photographer and writer whose subject is the intersection of human activity with nature as it might exist without our presence on the planet. Her current projects include a book about wilderness civilizations, a collection of photographs of the far northern tundra biome, and a body of work on the absence of natural darkness. She has received an Illinois Arts Council Individual Artists Fellowship, a Fulbright, and residences at Yaddo, MacDowell, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. In the summer of 2013, she joined a team of artists and scientists surveying archeological sites in the arctic as part of the Aldo Leonardo Wilderness Art and Science Collaboration.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Terry Hancock” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Terry Hancock” text_show=”Terry Hancock” text_hide=”Terry Hancock” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
The images in DEEPSKY were shot using a specialized telescope-mounted CCD camera for photographing astronomical objects. Nebulae and galaxies that are thousands to many millions of light years from our Earth, and in some cases, the light we see today from these objects began its journey before man walked our planet. The Horsehead and Flame Nebulae are also both emission nebulae that reside about 1500 light years from us in the constellation Orion. Bode’s Galaxy M81, a grand design spiral galaxy, lies approximately 12 million light years from us in the constellation of Ursa Major. The Heart Nebula IC1805 is an emission nebula that lies 7500 light years from us in the constellation Cassiopeia.

 

Bio:
Terry Hancock is an amateur astrophotographer whose images have been published in Astronomy, Sky At Night and Sky & Telescope magazines and many online publications. He has exhibited his work both locally and internationally including the recent International India Astro-Photo Festival. He gives talks for astronomy clubs, schools, libraries and various groups. His equipment is mounted in an 8′ x 8′ shed which houses a 4″ Refractor telescope, a 12” f/8 Ritchey-Chrétien astrograph and a Paramount Robotic mount which is controlled remotely from the inside of his home. Born in the United Kingdom and raised in Australia, today Terry resides close to the town of Fremont, where the skies are moderately dark.

 

[/toggler] [toggler theme=”boxed-white” title=”Yunjung Kang” inline=”no” ghost=”yes” hover=”no” group=”Yunjung Kang” text_show=”Yunjung Kang” text_hide=”Yunjung Kang” icon=”plus” icon_size=”20px” icon_background=”#ffffff” icon_color=”#6699cc” icon_position=”center” ]
Statement:
Yunjung Kang aims to make visible the complexity and rich structure of organic compositions and biological details. -holic references these natural phenomena, exploding the scale to emphasize the beauty and tactility of these abstract forms.

 

Bio:
Yunjung Kang was born in Busan, South Korea. She received her MFA and BFA from Dong-A University in Busan. After completing these programs, she moved to the United States to attend the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program in Fibers at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Currently, she is studying in the Fiber department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

 

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