Maya Lin: Art and Environment

Maya Lin in her StudioPhoto by Jesse Frohman

Maya Lin: Art and Environment

May 18, 2019 – September 1, 2019

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GRAM is pleased to announce a summer of 2019 exhibition featuring the work of renowned artist, architect, and designer Maya Lin. Organized by GRAM in collaboration with Lin’s studio, the exhibition focuses on large-scale sculpture that demonstrates Lin’s fascination with water as a subject. Created in materials such as silver, carved and polished marble, steel, and building materials, Lin’s work is conceived through the meticulous use of charting, mapping, and scientific research in determining each sculpture’s ultimate design, layout, and structure.

The timeliness of this exhibition is twofold. The focus on water and the environment is relevant now more than ever, and Lin’s compelling artworks will help raise environmental awareness and challenge visitors to ponder humanity’s relationship with the natural world. The exhibition also celebrates the approaching 20th anniversary of Maya Lin’s Ecliptic, which transformed downtown Grand Rapids’ Rosa Parks Circle into a central gathering space that has evolved into the heart of the city. Over 700,000 people visit this dramatic park and public work of art each year, enjoying ice-skating, concerts, festivals, and other community events. Inspired by the Grand River from which the city is named after, Ecliptic reflects Lin’s interpretation of the three forms of water —liquid, solid, and vapor—through the park’s ice rink and amphitheater, mist fountain, and tablet of flowing water.

“I’ve always been fixated on water,” says Lin. “Maybe it’s because it exists in multiple states, and you can never understand it in nature as a fixed moment in time.”

Maya Lin interprets the natural world through science, culture, history, and contemporary issues, and has created internationally renowned works of art and architecture over the past four decades. Lin designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial as an undergraduate student at Yale, and later went on to design significant works including, The Civil Rights Memorial in Alabama, the Women’s Table at Yale, and the Wave Field at the University of Michigan. Much of her body of work centers on the natural landscape and combines art and architecture. Lin’s work has been featured in numerous solo exhibitions at museums worldwide, and is found in permanent collections of major institutions such as the National gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, among others.

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Art in Bloom

A floral arrangement inside of the art gallery 

Art in Bloom

March 22, 2019 – March 24, 2019

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Art in Bloom is a bi-annual, one-weekend-only exhibition that celebrates the combined beauty of art and floral design. Come see the first signs of spring at the Museum while touring the galleries and enjoying extravagant floral sculptures. Our region’s most talented floral designers will create thought provoking and elegantly designed arrangements inspired by works from the Museum’s collection. These floral sculptures emphasize, challenge, and build upon elements and concepts within the original work of art, creating an extraordinary dialogue between the two pieces. Visitors will be invited to select the People’s Choice Award Winner by casting a vote for their favorite floral sculpture. This three-day exhibition is a must-see!

A Decade at the Center: Recent Gifts and Acquisitions

 

 

Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, 1606–1669). Nude Man Seated on the Ground with One Leg Extended, 1646. Etching on paper, 3.88 x 6.63 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum. Gift of Margaret Goebel, 2017.27.

A Decade at the Center: Recent Gifts and Acquisitions

January 26, 2019 – April 28, 2019

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GRAM closes out a yearlong celebration of the Museum’s first decade at 101 Monroe Center with an exhibition featuring works of art and design acquired through gift and purchase in commemoration of this auspicious anniversary. The exhibition spans all areas in which GRAM collects, from 19th century paintings to modern furniture, vintage photographs to rare Renaissance era engravings, and historical design objects to contemporary art. Artists in the exhibition include Mathias Alten, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Janet Fish, Alfred Stieglitz, James Van Der Zee, and Rembrandt van Rijin among many others.

With this exhibition, GRAM celebrates the crucial role of gifts in our ongoing effort to build one of the most notable collections in the American Midwest. Since the Museum’s inception in 1910, the generosity of our patrons has been crucial to building our permanent collection of over 6,000 objects.

Adult Workshop: Introduction to Cyanotype

Hands developing a bright blue cyanotype in a water bath 

Adult Workshop: Introduction to Cyanotype

November 4, 2018, 12:30 PM-3:30 PM

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Bridging the world of photography and printmaking, the cyanotype is one of the earliest photographic methods. Join us on a tour of GRAM’s collection to discuss the relationship between photography and print. Then, you will explore the cyanotype process from start to finish. Beginning with how to mix and coat material with emulsion, you will finish by exposing various objects and materials to create a one-of-a-kind set of prints in the dark room.

Open to ages 18+. Registration is required. Space is limited to 30 participants, so reserve your spot today. For more information, contact GRAM Studio at 616.831.2927 or gramstudio@artmuseumgr.org.

New quantity discounts! If you register multiple people or for multiple workshops, you can receive quantity discounts. Receive $3 off each ticket when purchasing three tickets and $4 off each ticket when purchasing four or more.

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Dylan Miner: Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives

Cyanotype photograph of cloudsDylan Miner (Métis, b. 1976). Cyanotype sample on fabric. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Dylan Miner: Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives

October 27, 2018 – March 3, 2019

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East Lansing-based artist and activist Dylan Miner will debut new work created for his Michigan Artist Series exhibition at GRAM that will focus on the natural environment of West Michigan and its history. Miner is a Michigan native of Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) descent. In his current work about the history and culture of Anishnaabewaki, the Indigenous Great Lakes region, Miner explores the degradation of regional resources, capitalism, and colonialism as a way to shape awareness and create dialogue around these complex, intertwining issues. Miner imagines his artistic practice as creating new forms of contemporary Great Lakes regionalism, by focusing on the natural elements that make Michigan so unique and important.

In Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives, Miner investigates the important historical and current issues around three primary natural elements: wood, water, and sky, and the traditional knowledge and beliefs around them within Great Lakes Indigenous cultures. For the exhibition, Miner will produce a series of large-scale cyanotype photographs on fabric that portray images of cloudy skies and water surfaces. For Miner, the blue color of the cyanotype process evokes water and sky, and also has symbolic correspondence to Michigan’s history around Indigenous issues of sovereignty. (The cyanotype process was first used in 1842, the year that the Treaty of LaPointe was signed, the last of the eight major treaties ceding land that is now Michigan.) Miner will also create site-specific sculptural elements for the exhibition from old growth timber and other arboreal materials.

The project also includes a series of workshops Miner has devised in collaboration with two younger Indigenous artists based in Grand Rapids, who will lead cyanotype-making workshops with West Michigan Indigenous youth at selected regional locales. These works produced by these youth, as well as Miner’s work in the exhibition, will be compiled in an accompanying artist’s book to be published by Issue Press of Grand Rapids.

Miner has exhibited his work internationally in solo and group exhibitions and been artist-in-residence or visiting artist at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, France, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. Miner is Director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Associate Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. He holds a PhD from The University of New Mexico and regularly publishes articles, book chapters, critical essays, and encyclopedia entries. In 2010, he was awarded an Artist Leadership Fellowship through the National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution).

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

Barnes & Thornburg
Beusse & Porter Family Foundation
The Jury Foundation
Steelcase Inc.

Related Events:

American Spectacle: Paintings from the Manoogian Collection

Thomas Moran (American, 1837–1926). The Great Cave, Pictured Rocks, Lake Superior, Michigan, 1873. Oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches. Manoogian Collection.

American Spectacle: Paintings from the Manoogian Collection

June 8, 2018 – August 5, 2018

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From sweeping landscapes to still life paintings, the eleven works on view in this exhibition reveal a variety of ways artists struggled to define the nation. Painted between 1855 and 1936, these works depict images of American spectacle–dramatic moments, places, and events in U.S. history. The turn of the century was a time of immense change, which prompted artists to explore issues of American culture and identity, national memory, and the meaning of history and progress.

This exhibition has been organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts and made possible by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Collection. This exhibition and museum collaboration is made possible by Terra-Art Bridges, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art and Art Bridges, Inc. Generous support has been provided by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation.

ArtPrize 10 at GRAM

 

 

Conrad Egyir

Conrad Egyir

The Labor of Love, 2018. Oil, and mounted plexiglass and wood on canvas. Triptych, each 102 x 84 inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote Code: 68461

Sarah FitzSimons

Sarah FitzSimons

Pacific Quilt, 2018. Cotton fabrics, batting, and thread, 21 x 23 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote code: 67108

Scott Froschauer

Scott Froschauer

(American, b. 1969). How Far to NOW? from the series, The Word on the Street, 2018. Department of Transportation Specification Street Sign, 104 x 12 inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote code: 68065

John Gutoskey

John Gutoskey

(American, b. 1962). PULSE Nightclub: 49 Elegies, 2016. 49 Monoprints, 28 x 20 inches each. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote code: 68075

Saskia Jorda

Saskia Jorda

(American, b. Venezuela 1978). Cacerolazo, 2017. Pots, pans, kitchen implements, and yarn. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote code: 68347

Nathaniel Lewis

Nathaniel Lewis

(American, b. 1981). Re:VOLVER, 2018 Aluminum and plastic, 13 x 13 x 3 feet. Courtesy of the Artist.

Vote code: 68343

William R. Mayer

William R. Mayer

(American, 1953-2017). Wall of Sound, 2015-2017. Mixed Media, 10 x 10 feet. Courtesy of the Estate of William R. Mayer.

Mark Newport

Mark Newport

(American, b. 1964). Redress 4, 2017. Embroidery on cotton, 36 x 33 inches. Courtesy of the Simone DeSousa Gallery, Detroit. Photo by Tim Thayer.

Vote Code: 68077

Mark Niskanen and Jani-Matti Salo

Mark Niskanen and Jani-Matti Salo

Mark Niskanen (Finnish, b. 1991) and Jani-Matti Solo (Finnish, b. 1984). No Names, 2016. Performance and installation. Image courtesy of the Artists.

Vote code: 67125

Lauren Strohacker and Kendra Sollars

Lauren Strohacker and Kendra Sollars

Lauren Strohacker (American, b. 1983) and Kendra Sollars (American, b. 1987). Animal Land, 2018. Digital Video Production. Courtesy of the Artists.

Vote code: 68404

ArtPrize 10 at GRAM

September 12, 2018 – October 14, 2018

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ArtPrize returns to GRAM this year with a diverse array of contemporary art in a broad spectrum of media. The Museum will exhibit the work of ten artists or artist pairs, hailing from Finland, Ghana, Venezuela, and the United States–including five based in Michigan. The exhibition will include work that takes advantage of GRAM’s dynamic architecture, beyond the gallery spaces alone, including large-scale nighttime projections on the building’s exterior. The exhibition also contains sculpture, painting, and interactive performance and installation works. The works on view tackle the subjects of public and private discourse, community engagement, and urgent social issues including hate crimes and environmental awareness.

GRAM is proud to host three projects which have been awarded ArtPrize Artist Seed Grants. Mark Niskanen and Jani-Matti Salo’s No Names, Lauren Strohacker and Kendra Sollars’ Animal Land, and Saskia Jorda’s Cacerolazo were awarded $2,000 in grants presented by the Frey Foundation.

More information about GRAM’s exhibition and participating artists can be found on the ArtPrize website.

ArtPrize extended hours:
Monday – Saturday: 12-8 pm
Sunday: 12-6 pm
Members-only hours: 10 am-12 pm every day

Please note that last entry is 20 minutes before the Museum closes.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:
Wege Foundation
Applause Catering + Events
Bank of America
Merrill Lynch
Eenhoorn, LLC.
James and Mary Nelson
Dirk and June Hoffius
Greg and Meg Willit
Boxed Water is Better
Robert Daverman, AIA / Grand Rapids Community Foundation
Gill
Jeff Gurney and Xuesi Li Gurney
Haworth, Inc.
Rothbury Farms
Fresh Thyme Farmers Market

In Kind
Holland Litho Printing Service
MADCAP Coffee Company

Related Events:

Show and Tell: GRAM Staff Selections from the Permanent Collection

A GRAM Staff member viewing a piece of furniture from the collection. 

Show and Tell: GRAM Staff Selections from the Permanent Collection

May 19, 2018 – September 12, 2018

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The Grand Rapids Art Museum employs over 60 individuals who work in a wide range of departments, from security and visitor services to education and facility management. Each staff member brings a different point of view to our organization and has a unique perspective on the artwork we display. For this exhibition, GRAM’s curatorial department asked staff members from across the museum to select works from the permanent collection that they felt a personal connection with. Selections might be by a staff member’s favorite artist, have a connection to a special memory, or be a tie to their cultural or ethnic background. Works on view will be accompanied by a label with information about each staff member and the reasons for their selection.

Mirror Variations: The Art of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

An image of a mirror mosaic installation by Monir Shahroudy FarmanfarmaianMonir Farmanfarmaian (Iranian, b. 1924). Tir (Convertible Series), 2015. Mirror, reverse-glass painting, plaster on wood, 63 x 63 x 6 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum. Museum Purchase, Wege Fund, 2018.1a-f. Photo by Robert Divers Herrick.

Mirror Variations: The Art of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

May 19, 2018 – October 7, 2018

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GRAM presents concurrent solo exhibitions featuring Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (Iranian) and Anila Quayyum Agha (Pakistani-American), both of whom create art that synthesize Islamic tradition and modern abstraction into objects of great beauty and depth.

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian has an international reputation for sculpture and drawing that fuses traditional Persian patterns based in mathematics with the geometric abstract art she got to know while living in New York City from 1945 to 1957. The artist’s primary materials¬–mirror and painted glass–were used extensively in traditional Persian architecture. Her work develops out of her interest in the serial progression of rectilinear forms, such as triangles, pentagons, and hexagons. Large sculptural reliefs with surfaces of cut mirror mosaic and reverse-glass painting form the core of Mirror Variations: The Art of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian. Works in the Convertible Series are multipart reliefs comprised of nearly-identical, interlocking elements which can be exhibited in a variety of configurations, each designed by the artist. Based on an ancient honeycomb dome design, the work Untitled (Muqarnas) unfolds like symmetrical mirrored wings. The exhibition also includes drawings featuring complex geometric motifs in jewel-tone colors.

Farmanfarmaian was born in Qazvin, Iran in 1924. She has studied and worked both in Iran and the United States. Her art has been included in numerous solo and group art exhibitions internationally, including a one-person exhibition in 2015 at New York’s Guggenheim Museum.

Lead Sponsor

Wege Foundation

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

James and Mary Nelson
Dirk and June Hoffius
Greg and Meg Willit
Jeff Gurney and Xuesi Li
Haworth, Inc.

Additional funding is provided by the GRAM Exhibition Society

Jane and John Meilner
Martin and Enid Packard
Progressive AE
Dr. Ghayas and Joy Uddin
Clark Communications