Melanie Daniel: Only Four Degrees

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Villagers, 2019. Oil on canvas, 49 x 40 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). You’re Daydreaming, 2019. Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Bottled Cacti, 2018. Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Midnight Unicorn, 2018. Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Millennial Menagerie, 2018. Oil on canvas, 24 x 20 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Sharing, 2018. Oil on canvas, 44 x 40 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

 

Melanie Daniel (Canadian, b. 1972). Tropical Delight, 2018. Oil on canvas, 44 x 34 inches. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Melanie Daniel: Only Four Degrees

May 18, 2019 – September 8, 2019

Become a member

Level III, Hunting Gallery

Melanie Daniel’s fear for humankind’s relationship with the natural world has fueled the paintings and works on view in Melanie Daniel: Only Four Degrees, her Michigan Artist Series exhibition at GRAM. In these recent large-scale paintings and works on paper, Daniel imagines a world at the brink of collapse by our chronic, longstanding disregard for its well-being. The people who populate her rich narrative pictures are painfully aware of their difficult circumstances and have adopted various methods to cope with their new surroundings. Daniel’s garish, unnatural palette, dense areas of vibrating pattern, and skewed perspectives underscore the uneasy relationship between the subjects and their environment.

The figures in her paintings and drawings still attempt the mundane tasks of daily life, but in a world inhospitable to normal routine they appear unmoored. In Villagers, a group gathered beneath an outdoor tarp prepare food. Instead of a bucolic picnic, the scene seems more a desperate attempt to maintain a semblance of normalcy. In the painting Only Four Degrees, a lone figure within a post-tsunami landscape futilely attempts to create a power source, or perhaps to make contact with others. In these works, the specific aims of Daniel’s protagonist are ambiguous, and often humorously hopeless. Daniel’s big, brash, and strangely beautiful works are both cautionary, yet hopeful, in that their protagonists demonstrate the will to adapt and survive. The works show, too, the resilience of nature, in which plants and flowers threaten to overrun the canvases. It is possible that our planet will become inhospitable to human life, but nature will find a way to survive.

Melanie Daniel was born in Victoria, British Columbia, and is based in Tel Aviv, Israel. She exhibits her art internationally, recently in exhibitions in the U.S., Canada, Israel, and Sweden. Among her recent awards are a Pollock-Krasner Grant and a New York Foundation for the Arts Grant, and in 2009 Daniel was awarded a solo exhibition for the Tel Aviv Museum of Art’s Rappaport Prize for a Young Israeli Artist. She is currently the Padnos Distinguished Visiting Artist/Professor at Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan, where she teaches a course in advanced painting. She is also collaborating with C.A. Frost Environmental Science Academy and Urban Roots community garden on projects related to climate change and the environment.

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

A New State of Matter: Contemporary Glass

 

Dean Allison (American, b. 1976). What would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared?, 2014. Cast glass, 15 x 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Habatat Galleries.

 

Erica Rosenfeld (American, b. England 1975). Reverie Forest III: Adelaide & Clementine, 2016. Glass and mixed media, 10 1/2 x 40 x 6 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Heller Gallery, New York.

 

Tali Grinshpan (Israeli/American, b. Israel 1972). Hope from the series Of Innocence and Experience, 2016. Pâte de verre, 10 x 10 x 5 inches. Courtesy of the Artist.

 

Charlotte Potter (American, b. 1981), Pending (detail), 2014. Cameo engraved glass and metal, 156 x 360 x 96 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Heller Gallery, New York.

 

Rachel Moore (American, b. 1979), Sugarplum, 2005. Cast lead crystal glass and cherries, 3 1/2 x 6 x 6 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Stewart Gallery.

 

Steffen Dam (Danish, b. 1961), Specimen Cabinet, 2017. Glass and mixed media, 39 1/4 x 25 x 10 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Heller Gallery, New York.

A New State of Matter: Contemporary Glass

January 25, 2020 – April 26, 2020

Become a member

Level II, Changing Exhibition Galleries

Glass has been called a new state of matter because it is not purely a liquid, solid, or gas. Glass can transition from a liquid to a solid over a wide temperature range, causing it to be nicknamed “chameleon matter”. This quality makes it an ideal medium for a wide array of processes including blowing, kiln-forming, casting, and flame-working.

Glass can be translucent, transparent, or opaque; it can refract images or reflect them back to the viewer; it is strong, yet delicate. These qualities make glass perfectly suited for artists to explore fragility, resiliency, transparency, and transformation. This exhibition features work by contemporary artists who are using glass in innovative ways, while presenting its metaphorical possibilities. Their artworks also connect to broader cultural, environmental, political, and spiritual themes.

Each of the nineteen artists included in the exhibition examines the material and symbolic potential of glass in unique and revealing ways. For example, artists Charlotte Potter and April Surgent use the ancient process of cameo glass engraving to explore relationships in the age of social media and climate change, respectively. Jeffrey Stenbom utilizes cast glass to unveil the struggles facing the nation’s veterans. David Chatt, in a repetitive, labor-intensive process, covers found objects with thousands of miniscule glass beads to discuss family and nostalgia. Amber Cowan repurposes American pressed glass to create her intricate installations that recall a by-gone era.

The exhibition also includes work by Grand Rapids artist Norwood Viviano. Viviano fuses fine arts practice with data and research findings in geography, economics, and the social sciences to create environments in which sensuous beauty and topical information coalesce. Viviano has said that, “The fragility of glass serves as a metaphor for balance between time, efficiency, and the inability of manufacturing to change and meet future needs.”

Featured artists include: Dean Allison, David Chatt, Amber Cowan, Steffen Dam, Morgan Gilbreath, Tali Grinshpan, Etsuko Ichikawa, Patrick Martin, Rachel Moore, Whitney Nye, Charlotte Potter, Michael Rogers, Erica Rosenfeld, Mary Shaffer, Jeffrey Stenbom, April Surgent, Judy Tuwaletstiwa, Norwood Viviano, and Jeff Zimmer.

This exhibition is organized by the Boise Art Museum

Sponsored by the Laura Moore Cunningham Foundation with additional grant support from the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

Self, Symbol, Surrogate: Artist Portraits from GRAM’s Collection

Photograph of two people looking at their reflection in a mirrorJess T. Dugan (American, b. 1986). Self-Portrait with Mom, 2011. Pigment print. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 2016.1a-b. ©Jess T. Dugan

Self, Symbol, Surrogate: Artist Portraits from GRAM’s Collection

March 21, 2019 – August 11, 2019

Become a member

Level I

Self, Symbol, Surrogate: Artist Portraits from GRAM’s Collection explores the many way artists engage in the tradition of portraiture, one of art’s oldest genres. The exhibition brings together iconic works and lesser known examples in the Museum’s collection to illustrate various approaches to portraiture from the 17th Century to today. Within the exhibition, works in a wide array of media are organized thematically. The thematic groupings address some of the numerous ways in which portraits function; some portraits record an individual’s status and wealth, while others document a more objective or critical view of history. Many artists use their intimate circle of family and friends as subjects, while others attempt to capture the genius or celebrity of extraordinary individuals. Some artists explore issues of identity through their own self-portraits and challenge the notion that a portrait should feature a face or figure at all.

Portraits can connect us to people whose lives are much different from our own and can reveal a range of human experiences. Portraits brought together around the theme of documentation demonstrate how portraiture can bear witness to people and life circumstances. More than this, these images can foster our empathy and awareness for those with whom we have little contact or even knowledge. Nicholas Nixon’s portraits of Joey Brandon, from the series People with AIDS, show the subject in close-up looking directly into the camera in order to facilitate a connection between the viewer and the subject. Nixon began this series in 1987, when HIV/AIDS was severely stigmatized, as a way for viewers to engage with someone they may not be able to otherwise.

Portraits connect us with their depicted subjects as well as with the artists who created them. In self-portraiture, artist and subject are one in the same, giving the viewer insight into the artists’ own self-image. An etched self-portrait by Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait Drawing at a Window (1648), is included in a section dedicated to artist self-portraits. Rembrandt was an extremely prolific self-portraitist for his time, creating nearly 100 images of himself. His impulse for self-reflection and revelation continues today in the work of artists who make self-portraits in which they explore their feelings and psychological states. One example is Mee Kyung Shim, who depicts herself rising from the water for a breath of air–a metaphor for her experience acclimatizing to American culture after relocating from Korea.

Because of the proliferation of smartphones and the popularity of social media, we see images of people everywhere. Today, nearly two billion images are uploaded to Facebook, Instagram, and other digital platforms every day–many millions of these are portraits in the form of snapshots and selfies. As the way we experience the world changes with technology, artists continue to push the boundaries of the portrait genre. The works in this exhibition prompt us to consider the ways the artists have depicted their subjects, the choices they made and the creativity behind them.

Related Events:

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

A Legacy of Love: Selections from The Mabel Perkins Collection

Black and white lithograph of resting tigerEugène Delacroix (French, 1798–1863) Tigre Royale, 1829. Lithograph on off-white laid paper, 12.8 x 18.25 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Gift of Mabel H. Perkins, 1956.2.142.

A Legacy of Love: Selections from The Mabel Perkins Collection

January 26, 2019 – April 28, 2019

Become a member

Level II, Hunting Gallery

During her lifetime, Mabel H. Perkins (1880-1974) was a renowned art collector and one of the Grand Rapids Art Museum’s greatest champions and supporters. Her love of art and an astute eye led her to assemble a remarkable collection of both artistic masters as well as excellent works by lesser known artists of her time. Perkins’ passion for art and for the people of Grand Rapids led her to donate more than 300 prints to the Museum over twenty-five years. This exhibition includes highlights from that gift, which are among some of the finest works in the museum’s collection. Among the artists on view are Albrecht Dürer, Édouard Manet, Mary Cassatt, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Pablo Picasso, Yves Tanguy, and Jasper Johns.

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

Maya Lin: Flow

 

Maya Lin, Blue Lake Pass, 2006. Duraflake particleboard installation, dimensions variable 5' 11" x 22' 5" x 17' 6" (180.3 x 683.3 x 533.4 cm), Overall. Installed from 30 x 36 x 36-1/2" (76.2 x 91.4 x 92.7 cm)to 71 x 36 x 36-1/2" (180.3 x 91.4 x 92.7 cm), 20 blocks, each. Photograph by G.R. Christmas. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

 

Maya Lin, Blue Lake Pass, 2006 (detail). Duraflake particleboard installation, dimensions variable 5' 11" x 22' 5" x 17' 6" (180.3 x 683.3 x 533.4 cm), Overall. Installed from 30 x 36 x 36-1/2" (76.2 x 91.4 x 92.7 cm)to 71 x 36 x 36-1/2" (180.3 x 91.4 x 92.7 cm), 20 blocks, each. Photograph by G.R. Christmas. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

 

Maya Lin, Silver Niagara, 2012-2013. Recycled silver, 48-1/8" x 75" x 1/2" (122.2 cm x 190.5 cm x 1.3 cm). Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

 

Maya Lin, The Deglaciation of the Laurentide, 2018. Paperboard, encaustic, aluminum 55-1/4× 71× 1" (140.3 × 180.3 × 2.5 cm). Photograph by Kris Graves. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

 

Maya Lin, Flow, 2009. FSC certified spruce, pine, and fir 2 x 4s, 2’ x 35’ x 11’. Photography courtesy Pace Gallery. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

Maya Lin: Flow

May 18, 2019 – September 1, 2019

Become a member

Level II, Changing Exhibition Galleries

GRAM is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent large-scale sculpture by renowned artist, architect, and designer Maya Lin (b. 1959). Organized by GRAM in collaboration with Lin’s studio, the exhibition features sculpture that demonstrates Lin’s fascination with the natural environment, specifically water, as subject. Created in recycled silver, steel pins, and common building materials, Lin conceives these sculptures with the use of charting, mapping, and scientific research to determine each work’s ultimate design, layout, and structure.

Lin has created two new sculptures for the exhibition that focus directly on West Michigan. Pin River – Grand River Watershed  (2019) is an installation made of steel pins imbedded directly into the wall that forms a sparkling fifteen-foot-long outline of the Grand River Watershed. At 260 miles in length, the Grand River is Michigan’s longest waterway and has been critical to the history and economy of Grand Rapids.  Untitled, Silver Lakes  (2019) is a shimmering wall relief cast from recycled silver. In creating the work, Lin charted the span of contemporary bodies of water from the Arctic to the Great Lakes that were formed by the melting of the Laurentide Ice Shelf, which once covered much of the North American continent. Through scope, scale, and the seeming use of abstraction, Lin expands our awareness of the Great Lakes and their connection to other bodies of water and to the geological forces that created them.

With Flow, Lin a committed environmentalist, focuses attention on the crucial role of water, both to our region, and to global survival. The exhibition also creates connection and dialogue with Ecliptic, the public park in Rosa Parks Circle created by Lin that marks its 20th anniversary next year. Water – specifically the nearby Grand River – also directly inspired Ecliptic. Within the park, Lin featured water in three different forms —liquid, solid, and vapor—through the park’s ice rink and amphitheater, mist fountain, and table of flowing water. “I’ve always been fixated on water,” says Lin. “Maybe it’s because it exists in multiple states, and you can never understand it in nature as a fixed moment in time.”

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

Wege Foundation
Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs
National Endowment for the Arts
Frey Foundation
Wolverine Worldwide
James and Mary Nelson
Shelley Padnos and Carol Sarosik
The Louis and Helen Padnos Foundation
Progressive AE
Dirk and June Hoffius
Lizbeth Sorensen O’Shaughnessy
Greg and Meg Willit
brightly
Conduit Studio
Foster Swift Collins & Smith PC
Jeff Gurney and Xuesi Li Gurney
Haworth, Inc.
J. Visser Design
Kathryn Chaplow Interior Design
Ritsu Katsumata and Stafford Smith
Barbara and Jim O’Connor
Martin and Enid Packard
Kathleen Stewart Ponitz

Additional Support Provided by GRAM Exhibition Society and the Friends of Maya Lin Group
Reagan Marketing + Design, LLC
Stephanie Naito
Creamer Consulting
Jane Timmer

Related Events:

Art in Bloom

A graphic design element that reads 'Art in Bloom' 

Art in Bloom

March 22, 2019 – March 24, 2019

Become a member

Level III

Art in Bloom will return this spring for a bi-annual one-weekend-only exhibition that celebrates the combined beauty of art and floral design. Visitors are invited to tour the galleries and enjoy extravagant floral sculptures inspired by works from the Museum’s permanent collection created by some of the region’s most talented floral designers. These floral sculptures emphasize, challenge and build upon elements and concepts within the original work of art, creating an extraordinary dialogue between two pieces.

Participating Floral Designers

Thank you to our sponsors!

Presenting Sponsor
Karl and Patricia Betz
Gregg and Rajene Betz
Kimberly and David Moorhead

Tulip Sponsor
Janet Gatherer Boyles and John Boyles

Lilac Sponsor
Patricia and Charles Bloom
Le Bon Macaron
Reagan Marketing + Design, LLC
West Michigan Master Gardeners Association

Printing Sponsor
Holland Litho Printing

Related Events:

A Decade at the Center: Recent Gifts and Acquisitions

 

Dawoud Bey (American, b. 1953) Two Women at a Parade, 1978 (2011 print), gelatin silver photograph, 8 x 11 7/8 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 2018.21. © Dawoud Bey, Courtesy of Stephen Daiter Gallery

 

Lilla Cabot Perry (American, 1848–1933) In the Studio, c. 1895. Oil on canvas, 25.75 x 32 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, James and Judy DeLapa, 2016.7

 

William E. Gundelfinger (1900–1976) KM 'Flatwork Ironer' Iron, Model no 444, 1939. Chromium-plated steel, Bakelite. Made by Knapp-Monarch Co., 5 x 7 3/8 x 7 3/4 inches. Photo by Shane Culpepper, Tulsa OK.

 

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (Iranian, b. 1924) Untitled, 1980, ink and pen on paper, 18 x 25 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Gift of the Artist and Haines Gallery, 2018.12 ©Monir Farmanfarmaian

 

Janet Fish (American, b. 1938) Daffodils and Cereal, 1994, oil on canvas, 38 x 36 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Gift of Miner S. and Mary Ann Keeler, 2017.1 © Janet Fish/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

 

Salvador Jiménez-Flores (American, b. Mexico 1985) I Am Not Who You Think I Am/No soy quien crees que soy, 2014, ceramic and mixed media. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 2014.44-46 © Salvador Jiménez-Flores

 

Adonna Khare (American, b. 1980) Elephant Whirlpool, 2014, carbon pencil on paper, 96 x 72 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Museum Purchase, with funds from Bill and Marilyn Crawford and the Artist, 2014.10 © Adonna Khare

 

Charles Garabedian (American, 1923–2016) Apotheosis, 1995-96, acrylic on canvas, 96 x 84 inches. Grand Rapids Art Museum, Gift of Lucille and Ron Neeley, 2018.16 ©Charles Garabedian

A Decade at the Center: Recent Gifts and Acquisitions

January 26, 2019 – April 28, 2019

Become a member

Level II, Changing Exhibition Galleries

The Grand Rapids Art Museum closes out a yearlong celebration of the Museum’s first decade at 101 Monroe Center with an exhibition featuring gifts and acquisitions to the permanent collection from the last five years. The exhibition spans all areas in which GRAM collects, from 19th century paintings to contemporary art, mid-century modern furniture to vintage photography, and rare Renaissance engravings to historical design objects. The exhibition represents a broad spectrum of human creativity and innovation sure to spark the imagination. Nearly half of the works in the exhibition are on public view for the first time.

The exhibition comprises recent museum purchases, as well as gifts and promised gifts from numerous generous individuals and institutions. In some cases, these acquisitions expand the museum’s holding of works by particular artists, such as Mathis J. Alten, Andy Warhol, Richard Diebenkorn, Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, and Alex Katz, or, introduce important artists new to the collection, including Oswaldo Vigas, Dawoud Bey, and Carrie Mae Weems. A pair of 15th century engravings by Martin Schongauer are the oldest works in the exhibition, promised gifts of Cate and Sid Jansma Jr., founders of GRAM’s extraordinary Jansma Print Collection. Notable new contemporary works will be on view as well, including a print by American artist Kara Walker in her recognizable silhouette-style, a promised gift from Martin and Enid Packard, important long-time supporters of GRAM.

GRAM’s commitment to exhibiting and collecting design and craft is illustrated by the inclusion of important works of furniture, ceramics, glass, and industrial design. This section of the exhibition features highlights from GRAM’s design collection dating from the early 19th century to the present. From chairs and lamps to tableware and electronics, these objects marry function and beauty and show the power design has to enhance our daily lives. On view for the first time are several pieces from a major new gift of over 100 design objects from one of the premier American collectors. This generous gift will greatly expand the museum’s design holdings and better tell the story of West Michigan’s rich history as a leading center of design and manufacturing.

With this exhibition, GRAM celebrates the crucial role of gifts in our ongoing effort to build one of the most notable collections in the American Midwest. Since the Museum’s inception in 1910, the generosity of our patrons has been crucial to building our permanent collection of over 6,000 objects.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:
Wege Foundation
James and Mary Nelson
Cate and Sid Jansma, Jr.
Dirk and June Hoffius
Greg and Meg Willit
Kurt and Madelon Hassberger
Haworth, Inc.

Additional funding is provided by the GRAM Exhibition Society.

Related Events:

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

Adult Workshop: Introduction to Cyanotype

Hands developing a bright blue cyanotype in a water bath 

Adult Workshop: Introduction to Cyanotype

November 4, 2018, 12:30 PM-3:30 PM

Buy ticketsBecome a member

Bridging the world of photography and printmaking, the cyanotype is one of the earliest photographic methods. Join us on a tour of GRAM’s collection to discuss the relationship between photography and print. Then, you will explore the cyanotype process from start to finish. Beginning with how to mix and coat material with emulsion, you will finish by exposing various objects and materials to create a one-of-a-kind set of prints in the dark room.

Open to ages 18+. Registration is required. Space is limited to 30 participants, so reserve your spot today. For more information, contact GRAM Studio at 616.831.2927 or gramstudio@artmuseumgr.org.

New quantity discounts! If you register multiple people or for multiple workshops, you can receive quantity discounts. Receive $3 off each ticket when purchasing three tickets and $4 off each ticket when purchasing four or more.

jQuery( window ).load(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”, “auto”);}); jQuery( window ).resize(function() {var coverHeight = jQuery(“#content-image”).height(); var fullCoverHeight = jQuery(“.image-caption”).height(); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“margin-top”,”-“+coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“#cover-image”).css(“height”, coverHeight+”px”); jQuery(“.image-caption”).css(“height”,”auto”);});

Dylan Miner: Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives

Cyanotype photograph of cloudsDylan Miner (Métis, b. 1976). Cyanotype sample on fabric. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Dylan Miner: Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives

October 27, 2018 – March 3, 2019

Become a member

East Lansing-based artist and activist Dylan Miner will debut new work created for his Michigan Artist Series exhibition at GRAM that will focus on the natural environment of West Michigan and its history. Miner is a Michigan native of Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) descent. In his current work about the history and culture of Anishnaabewaki, the Indigenous Great Lakes region, Miner explores the degradation of regional resources, capitalism, and colonialism as a way to shape awareness and create dialogue around these complex, intertwining issues. Miner imagines his artistic practice as creating new forms of contemporary Great Lakes regionalism, by focusing on the natural elements that make Michigan so unique and important.

In Water is Sacred // Trees are Relatives, Miner investigates the important historical and current issues around three primary natural elements: wood, water, and sky, and the traditional knowledge and beliefs around them within Great Lakes Indigenous cultures. For the exhibition, Miner will produce a series of large-scale cyanotype photographs on fabric that portray images of cloudy skies and water surfaces. For Miner, the blue color of the cyanotype process evokes water and sky, and also has symbolic correspondence to Michigan’s history around Indigenous issues of sovereignty. (The cyanotype process was first used in 1842, the year that the Treaty of LaPointe was signed, the last of the eight major treaties ceding land that is now Michigan.) Miner will also create site-specific sculptural elements for the exhibition from old growth timber and other arboreal materials.

The project also includes a series of workshops Miner has devised in collaboration with two younger Indigenous artists based in Grand Rapids, who will lead cyanotype-making workshops with West Michigan Indigenous youth at selected regional locales. These works produced by these youth, as well as Miner’s work in the exhibition, will be compiled in an accompanying artist’s book to be published by Issue Press of Grand Rapids. Both the youth workshops and upcoming publication are generously supported by Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

Miner has exhibited his work internationally in solo and group exhibitions and been artist-in-residence or visiting artist at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, France, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. Miner is Director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Associate Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. He holds a PhD from The University of New Mexico and regularly publishes articles, book chapters, critical essays, and encyclopedia entries. In 2010, he was awarded an Artist Leadership Fellowship through the National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution).

Lead support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

Barnes & Thornburg LLP

With additional support from:
Beusse & Porter Family Foundation
The Jury Foundation
Steelcase Inc.

American Spectacle: Paintings from the Manoogian Collection

Thomas Moran (American, 1837–1926). The Great Cave, Pictured Rocks, Lake Superior, Michigan, 1873. Oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches. Manoogian Collection.

American Spectacle: Paintings from the Manoogian Collection

June 8, 2018 – August 5, 2018

Buy ticketsBecome a member

From sweeping landscapes to still life paintings, the eleven works on view in this exhibition reveal a variety of ways artists struggled to define the nation. Painted between 1855 and 1936, these works depict images of American spectacle–dramatic moments, places, and events in U.S. history. The turn of the century was a time of immense change, which prompted artists to explore issues of American culture and identity, national memory, and the meaning of history and progress.

This exhibition has been organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts and made possible by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Collection. This exhibition and museum collaboration is made possible by Terra-Art Bridges, an initiative of the Terra Foundation for American Art and Art Bridges, Inc. Generous support has been provided by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation.