Maurice Sendak: Where the Wild Things Are

Maurice Sendak: Where the Wild Things Are

April 9, 2016 – May 22, 2016

Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are has sparked the imaginations of generations of readers since its publication in 1963. As an artist, illustrator, and author, Sendak expanded the scope of children’s literature to acknowledge children as intelligent individuals with powerful emotions–boredom, anger, fear, and of course, the need to be where someone loved them best of all.

Sendak’s love of art and books began as a child, when he was often sick and confined to bed. He would later infuse his stories and illustrations with these early experiences of illness and family tragedy, but also the joy and magic of his astounding imagination. This exhibition celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Where the Wild Things Are with original drawings, prints, posters and more from one of the greatest children’s authors of the 20th century.

ArtPrize Seven at GRAM: Nature/Nurture

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Event or Exhibition?Exhibition
TitleArtPrize Seven at GRAM: Nature/Nurture
Internal Short TitleNature/Nurture
Date / Opening DateSeptember 17, 2015
Closing DateOctober 11, 2015
All day event?No
Calendar ReadyYes
Gallery SpaceCE1, CE2, Design and Modern Craft, Hunting
Credit LineGrand Rapids Art Museum
Exhibition SummaryArtPrize Seven at GRAM will bring another thematic exhibition of work by artists from across the globe to West Michigan. This exhibition will address this theme in its broadest sense, serving as a framework for exhibiting and interpreting a wide range of different works of art. Nature/Nurture will explore the circumstances of every-day life and the complex character of identity. Are we a product of our DNA or of our environment? The classic construct of nature versus nurture as debated by philosophers and scientists will be only one dimension of this multi-faceted exhibition. Nature/Nurture will also investigate the numerous ways in which artists address the themes of nature and nurture separate from one another.
Exhibition TypeArtPrize
Notes for CommunicationsTHIS IS ARTPRIZE YA'LL!!
Go Live DateSeptember 2, 2015
StatusPending
PublishedYes
Show in Monthly CalendarYes
Related ExhibitionNature/Nurture
PriorityA
Short CopyArtPrize Seven at GRAM will bring another thematic exhibition of work by artists from across the globe to West Michigan. This exhibition will address this theme in its broadest sense, serving as a framework for exhibiting and interpreting a wide range of different works of art. Nature/Nurture will explore the circumstances of every-day life and the complex character of identity. Are we a product of our DNA or of our environment? The classic construct of nature versus nurture as debated by philosophers and scientists will be only one dimension of this multi-faceted exhibition. Nature/Nurture will also investigate the numerous ways in which artists address the themes of nature and nurture separate from one another.
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Long CopyArtPrize Seven at GRAM will bring another thematic exhibition of work by artists from across the globe to West Michigan. This exhibition will address this theme in its broadest sense, serving as a framework for exhibiting and interpreting a wide range of different works of art. Nature/Nurture will explore the circumstances of every-day life and the complex character of identity. Are we a product of our DNA or of our environment? The classic construct of nature versus nurture as debated by philosophers and scientists will be only one dimension of this multi-faceted exhibition. Nature/Nurture will also investigate the numerous ways in which artists address the themes of nature and nurture separate from one another.
Long Copy SignoffWill
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Img 300@2xhttp://www.artmuseumgr.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/NN_300@2x.jpg
Img 300 TitleArtPrize Seven at GRAM: Nature/Nurture
Img 300 BlurbNature/Nurture will explore the circumstances of every-day life and the complex character of identity.
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CategoryExhibitions
User IDWill Olson

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Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise

Platter, c. 1942-1948. Gulf Stream. Sarah A. E. “Sadie” Irvine with Kenneth Smith or Francis Ford. Newcomb Art Collection, Tulane University.

Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise

January 31, 2016 – April 17, 2016

The exhibition presents over 125 rarely-exhibited Newcomb ceramics, tableware, jewelry, textiles, bookbinding, and graphics, from one of the most remarkable collections of 20th century American pottery.

Between 1894 and 1948, some of the most beautiful and functional art objects of the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts movements were created at the Newcomb Pottery Enterprise in New Orleans. The Pottery was an innovative educational experiment as much as an operational facility: it was conceived in the late 19th century at Newcomb Memorial College, Tulane University’s coordinate institution for women, as an income-generating venture for women training in the applied arts.

The Newcomb School operated under the philosophy that no two handcrafted objects should be alike, as evident in the wide-ranging works of the exhibition. The selection of handcrafted objects showcases the Pottery artisans’ unique interpretations of animal and botanical subjects, including the flora and fauna of the American South.

Women, Art, and Social Change includes examples from the full range of the Newcomb collection, from the naturalistic, blue and green tones, to the signature design of vertically banded spatial divisions, to the austere, modernist aesthetic that celebrated the vessel form. The exhibition is rounded out with historical photographs and artifacts that lend additional insight into the Newcomb Pottery story.

The exhibition serves as a retrospective of the works of the students and teachers of Newcomb Memorial College, and their important contribution to women’s rights and social change. The Newcomb model proved successful during a time of economic hardship, providing financial stability and economic autonomy for numerous women, who established themselves vocationally as independent artisans, instructors, activists, and businesswomen. This pioneering cohort of self- reliant women not only made a lasting impact on the art community, but also proved the value of an education, during a time in which learning opportunities for women in the Deep South were lacking.

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The Grand Rapids presentation of this exhibition is made possible by James and Mary Nelson, Greg and Meg Willit, Rothbury Farms, Glen Johnson and Tom Merchant, and the GRAM Exhibition Society (sponsorships as of release date).

Friends of Newcomb
Michigan Women’s Foundation
Reagan Marketing + Design, LLC
Becky Anderson, Edward Jones
Kathryn Chaplow
Catherine Creamer
Experience Grand Rapids
Fairly Painless Advertising
Erin Gravelyn
Grand Rapids Opportunities for Women (GROW)
Birgit Klohs
Languages International Inc.
Martin and Enid Packard

GRAM Selects ArtPrize Seven: Encore

GRAM Selects ArtPrize Seven: Encore

November 27, 2015 – August 14, 2016

GRAM Selects ArtPrize Seven: Encore will showcase some of the strongest works exhibited across Grand Rapids during the annual art competition. GRAM curators will be selecting works originally shown in various ArtPrize venues to be part of an exclusive extension of the ArtPrize experience at GRAM. Chosen for their artistic strength and resonance with the museum’s collection, works from ArtPrize Seven will be displayed among works in GRAM’s collection spanning many centuries, on all three floors of the Museum. Displaying contemporary works of art in and among the Museum’s permanent collection will encourage guests to explore the unique and surprising connections between them. Chosen works will be announced at the conclusion of ArtPrize Seven, and will be on view by Thanksgiving weekend.

What is ArtPrize Encore? from Grand Rapids Art Museum on Vimeo.

Sponsorship Listing As of Print Date

 

Additional funding is provided by the GRAM Annual Exhibition Fund supporters:

Jim and Mary Nelson

Shared Sensibilities: Weidenaar Among his Contemporaries and Predecessors

Departure for the Fields. Claude Lorrain (French, 1604-1682). Departure for the Fields, 1638-1641. etching on paper. Gift of Mabel H. Perkins, 1964.2.6

Shared Sensibilities: Weidenaar Among his Contemporaries and Predecessors

October 25, 2015 – January 17, 2016

Shared Sensibilities places Reynold Weidenaar’s prints alongside those of his predecessors and contemporaries, from seventeenth-century French and Dutch artists to his teacher and fellow regionalist, Thomas Hart Benton. Organized to complement Reynold Weidenaar: A Retrospective, this exhibition of works from GRAM’s collection presents the art of Reynold Weidenaar within the context of both modern and traditional American and European printmaking, showing where he drew inspiration in developing his skill and distinctive style.

Sponsorship Listing As of Print Date

 

Additional funding is provided by the GRAM Annual Exhibition Fund supporters:

Jim and Mary Nelson

Michigan Artist Series Norwood Viviano: Global Cities

Norwood Viviano American, b. 1972 Global Cities, 2015. Blown glass and vinyl cut drawings. Collection of Heller Gallery, New York

Michigan Artist Series Norwood Viviano: Global Cities

November 19, 2015 – February 7, 2016

Since the 19th century, artists have made the city and urban life a frequent subject of their work. A visual artist and educator with a deep interest in the social sciences, Norwood Viviano creates mixed media installations of sculpture, text, and graphic elements. Global Cities comprises a group of hand-blown glass sculptures, suspended from the ceiling, each of which represents an international city, such as Grand Rapids, Rome, or Beijing. The size and shape of these glass objects is determined by the city’s age and population growth. The information on display throughout the installation ties together various cultural, social, and economic factors that have shaped the history and life of these urban centers.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

Steelcase Inc.

Porter Foundation

The Jury Foundation

Sponsorship Listing As of Print Date

 

Additional funding is provided by the GRAM Annual Exhibition Fund supporters:

Jim and Mary Nelson

Reynold Weidenaar: A Retrospective

Reynold H. Weidenaar (American, 1915-1985) Dawn the Awakening City, 1951 Etching on paper 2 ½ x 3 in. Collection of Weidenaar Portfolio, Inc.

Reynold Weidenaar: A Retrospective

October 25, 2015 – January 17, 2016

This retrospective exhibition of prints, watercolors, and oil paintings by Grand Rapids native Reynold Weidenaar (1915 – 1985) celebrates his varied and remarkable career on the 100th anniversary of his birth. Nationally recognized and locally beloved, Weidenaar is one of West Michigan’s most acclaimed and talented artists.

Weidenaar’s work is timeless, yet rooted in 20th century American Regionalism, a movement devoted to accurately representing small town and rural life. Reflecting on his career in a 1980 interview Weidenaar said, “I love to record the world around me, and that world is Michigan.” His work depicts West Michigan through a uniquely personal perspective and historical context, and his deep familiarity with the region’s people and places provided him with a wealth of subject matter to explore.

Talented, ambitious, and restlessly creative, Weidenaar repeatedly challenged himself to improve his skills and master new artistic techniques. He was known for his technical virtuosity as draftsman and printmaker, and became successful in the 1940s exhibiting and selling his etchings. Though the technique was not widely practiced in the twentieth century, Weidenaar began creating mezzotint prints in the 1950s. These were especially well received, and his work in mezzotint helped to spur a renewed appreciation and awareness of this unique form of printmaking.

In 1954 he took up watercolor painting, and within ten years had created 1,300 watercolors of West Michigan subjects–delightful landscapes and industrial scenes that burst with life. Not content with having mastered etching, mezzotint, and watercolor, Weidenaar also applied himself to painting in oil, and to rediscovering the techniques of the Dutch and Flemish Old Masters.

GRAM joins three other Grand Rapids cultural institutions in celebrating Weidenaar’s centenary year. In spring of 2015, the Grand Rapids Public Museum presented Through the Eyes of Weidenaar, which focused on his self-designated role of chronicler of his community. Concurrent with GRAM’s retrospective are exhibitions at Calvin College’s Center Art Gallery and Kendall College of Art and Design at Ferris State University. Calvin’s exhibition examines the artist’s working methods, including multiple states of individual prints, while Kendall College of Art and Design provides an overview of the artist’s work in drawing and watercolor.

View a selection of work on Google Open Gallery to learn more about Reynold H. Wiedenaar.

InteractiveHEADER

Download Reynold Weidenaar: An Interactive e-publication.

To view this book, you must have an iPad with iBooks 2 or later and iOS 5 or later, or an iPhone with iOS 8.4 or later, or a Mac with OS X 10.9 or later.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by:

The Meijer Foundation
Wege Foundation
Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation
Mrs. David Hunting Jr.
Cate and Sid Jansma, Jr.
James and Mary Nelson
Greg and Meg Willit
Jim and Donna Brooks
Sam and Janene Cummings

Additional funding is provided by:

The GRAM Exhibition Society

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air

May 17, 2015 – August 30, 2015

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air was organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and curated by Chrissie Iles, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Curator.

In the Air shows a time-lapse panoramic view of New York City shot from the roof of the artist’s studio from dawn to dusk, interrupted by six short films inspired by a different view from the studio windows.

The original vision for the Empire State Building to be an entry point for trans-Atlantic Zeppelin passengers is imagined; the apocryphal story of Andy Warhol’s launch of silver mylar balloons into the street as the Pope passed by in the 1970s is acted out; one vignette pays homage to the life of Gloria Vanderbilt, lived out in the spotlight; and the last film shows the phenomenon known as Manhattanhenge, which occurs when the sun can be seen setting in the narrow gap between the canyon-like walls of the city’s east-west street grid.

Regarding his work, Wilcox said, “I like my film and video work to appear as the visible record of my own journey through our saturated mediated age, highlighting those things that have held my attention and captured my imagination. Just as our perception of a present is a hybrid of personal memory, historical record, family lore, political, social, national, and artistic histories and mythologies, film and video provide the page upon which I make a collage of the ideas I hold most dear.”

Using the latest in digital video technology to capture footage atop his penthouse studio—18 floors above Union Square in Manhattan—Wilcox’s work is a 360-degree, cinematic record of a day in the city, compressed into a 30 minute film. The New York Times has given rave reviews for In the Air, saying that, “the majesty and clarity of this wraparound vista is stunning. The city looks older, almost timeless, without the details of street traffic and storefronts.”

Traveling to GRAM from the Whitney Museum of American Art, this multi-media exhibition will serve as a remarkable celebration of the urban skyline.

In the Air is projected on a circular screen that is over 7 feet high and 35 feet in diameter, creating a truly mesmerizing experience for GRAM visitors that immerses them within an environment that bends time, space, history, and memory.